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boomers start to retire. the key is better education given communities of color represent nearly half of today's students in k-12. we need to increase funding for education, especially preschool education, which is the single most effective way to ensure a child's academic success in school. we need some support local organizations on the ground serving these communities and making the most difference in our communities. organizations such as the local and regional urban league. the bank for the buck we get from investing in these groups is enormous. they have business models to allow them to succeed. finally, there has been a great deal of talk since the election on whether there is new life on the immigration issue. i believe there is. we are working hard to capitalize on the momentum the election provided on this issue. we have not heard a lot about how enacting comprehensive immigration reform can help on the job and economic issues. immigration reform will create an effective system that levels the playing field for all workers. right now, our immigration system does not work for
public schools. they will discuss america's education system and its impact on security. it is part of a event hosted by the excellence in foundation for education. right now we are listening to introductory remarks. >> the first african-american woman to hold that post. she's a former national security advisor under president george w. bush. she is also the cofounder of the center for a new generation, which is an innovative afterschool enrichment program, and she is the co-author of numerous books, including two bestsellers. she is an undergraduate degree from the university of denver, a masters from notre dame, and a phd from the university of denver. mr. klein and doctor rice are going to be discussing a report that they have authored, which has been published in march of this year by the council on foreign relations. among many things, this report notes that while the united states invests more in k-12 public education than many other developed countries, students are woefully ill-prepared to compete globally. one tidbit according to the results of the 2000 my program for inter
>> now we will discuss education policy and school choice with kevin chavous. this is about an hour. >> thank you all for coming tonight. i hope you have a good time and learned quite a bit about "gen next" and the topic tonight, which is education. "gen next" is an organization of entrepreneurs and executives. the reason we have this type of membership is because we believe in developing and deploying an engaging talent. our mission is clearly generational opportunity. we want the future to be at least as successful as the past. you hear some debates about our best days are behind us. we do not like that narrative. we want to take. don draper of "madmen" said, "if you do not like what is being said, change the conversation. -- conversation." in your talent and resources could be used to even be more accomplished and how you are now. economics education and secur, education, and security. education is the most important issue. you're talking about true generational investment. there is a moral element. you're giving it had a shot. there is an economic element. we're struggling a lot
to maintain our$mk ei-commitment to educating the whole child. let me be clear, there is no extra money as a result of propwñ?ñ 30. on our website we have included frequently asked questions regarding proposition 30 and what it means÷=u b district. for more information visit=;]!wt www.sfusd.edu. thank you for that i've received from the public, askingt aboutb "bóweme ?ñ information around prop 30. i also would like to share that as superintendent i often receivec "1? and members of the communityj about therxñ?ñ? direction of our schools. and while we are fortunate to receive2 feedback one of the concerns i hear from many is whether or not standardized testing in math and/]ñ?ñ? english has narrowed what and how we teach our students. the answerwe boo to this question is#v÷ux]ú an.Ñr mastery of specific skills and subject materials align to state standardscñ?ñ? in math and english that are assessed, usingdñ?ñ standardized tests are only a small part of what is being taught in our san francisco schools. q+k
, and when you look at recent report that the federal department of education presented basically has the definition of bullying in every single state and also a list of i think 37 components and ranks that show you state by state which ones include those components of it. as we heard earlier the federal department is close to approving a federal definition of bullying, so i do believe there is a lot of work in this area. i also think there is a lot of work going on in terms of evidence based practices in terms of interventions that is very exciting. some of the information that we know is that about 80% of the bullying that goes on can pretty much be handled by some very prescribed ways of dealing with things. 20% requires really very targeted social emotional behavioral approach and i think that as we get better at that knowing what methods work with which kids we're going to come a long ways in terms of the interventions and then being successful with those. >> thank you. >> a lot of folks talked about the culture of a school and improving the culture of a school. when i was do
?ñ?rd of education the superintendent report tonightfjñ?ñ? or his thoughts. superintendent craza. >> that's listening and watching on tv. because this is the only meeting6÷ñ?ñ? in november i had a few thoughts so i will be as quick as possible. but[b+ 75b i want to start this evening by saying that on behalf ofbr:?"jÑzÑñ?ñ?ñ the san francisco unified school district, and school districts across the state of we want to thank the voters for their support of propositionzó;r(wagm which will enable -- >> rwjv [applause.] -- >> which will enable the san francisco unified school district to maintain the same level of funding from the 2011-12 school year and stave off additional mid-year cuts such as forced closure while prop 30 received slightlyijókgáy more of the majority to pass statewide we in san francisco passed the measure by an overwhelmingoÑñ?ñ?ñ margin. once again -- >> [applause.] >> yes. once+ ? again as san franciscans we have demonstrated our commitment to theñ?ñ children of our community and
to see you in january. thank you. [applause] >> we have military run schools. the average cost to educate a child in that school per year is $50,000. almost four times what the rest of the public of education costs we use public schools. we could take the money we are spending today and build every school system 14,000 per child and save billions of dollars per year with the same or better outcomes. present obama welcome to to the white house on tuesday. before the meeting the leaders addressed the office. the president-elect took office on saturday december to date to november 1st but joe biden allegation that the inauguration. this is 15 minutes. >> it is my great pleasure to welcome the president-elect to the oval office and to the white house this is a longstanding tradition i think the relationship between the countries we meet early with the president-elect of mexico that symbolizes the extraordinary relationship we have between the two countries. >> why >> [speaking in native tongue] with >> over the last four years i've been able to work with the what president for lady calderon a
. [applause] >> now, the national urban league hosts a discussion on education and jobs. the penal code which includes the head of the urban league mark morel talks about the spending priorities as lawmakers face potential budget cuts. this is just over an hour. >> let me contextualize urban ideas forum. not recently, you heard it from that former candidate for high office talk about urban as being the reason that one ticket was not successful on november the sixth. in using a term, he may have been to characterize urban as meaning from them urbanist not. urban is not a synonym for black or african american. urban is not a synonym for hispanic latino or asian. urban is not a synonym for communities of color. what urban represents is the coming together, the mixture, the melting, the synthesis of all the communities of america. look at america's urban communities today. in america's urban communities, every group resides. every economic class resides. every strand of political philosophy resides. great academic institutions make up the fabric of urban america. great media organizations, librar
deep. superintendent. the action is that the board of education for san francisco unified accept the report from independent auditors for the 2012 visits of the district 28 schools that arel[7unuç ranked 1 through three on the academic performance api. >> yes questions from the board? >> i just want to say i was very pleased to read that most of all of our facilitiese7amn!7w were n compliance with the audit, with the exception of two school facilities, and apparently those deficiencies were addressed right away. so i want to thank david goldin and his staff and the williams team on responding so rapidly. >> thank you. >> vice president norton. >> vice president norton: thank you. i was -- i did hear1jsdzen some complaints that were not reflected in the audit report about middle school textbooks not being available for all students, particularly students in special day classes. and i'm just wondering if the auditors found any -- that there was any -- you know, that they noticed any instances of that. i did hear complaints and each with my own child actually had to request a textb
? observed the holiday known as columbus daysvñ? weekend we didt educate our children on why we observed it. i found it ironic that something indigenous could be perceived as principals and teachers and parents weret÷ñ?ñ?ñ supportive d these types of events provide acceptances and understanding of other cultures and give us better understanding and appreciation of our own. so even though it was a labor of love and strong emphasis on labor and love, that this was a collaborative effort that would not have happened without the support of our principal, our internal pco board and the family voice and of course the indian education program. michael -- that becomes an annual program and feel strongly with the continued support of9[? the members of the board of education, our superintendent's office and the indian education program that this could be implemented inese r every schol throughout the district. thank you. >> thank you. item k, advisory committee reports and appointments to advisory committee by the board members. any appointment by board members? megan. >> i'd like to appoint aib
annual education summit. we covered yesterday's events pick. that's where we begin. mr. bush says the unions are barriers to better schools. how would you fix your school system? we want to get your take on it. also, send us a tweet, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail. we begin with the "washington times headline" -- we want to show you what the former florida governor had to say at yesterday's event. [video clip] >> we need to have a teacher evaluation system that is based on teachers being professionals and not part of some collective trade union bargaining process. we have a system to reward teachers based on an industrial and unionized model that is completely inappropriate for the 21st century, completely inappropriate. there are incredibly fine teachers that get paid less even though they are doing the lord's work consistently over time and there are teachers that are mediocre that get paid more because they have been there longer. long did it is not the determining factor of success in the classroom. we need to make sure that we provide all sorts of resou
with the board of supervisors and the board of education working together and talking about this issue. and the pac is actively participating with community organizations and helping to be part of the effort to bring people together. we are not the only ones working to bring other folks together. but, in the conversation, earlier today, was colman advocates, parents for public schools, the baby association for youth, chinese affirmative action, the central american resource center, james town center and mission graduates are all talking about this issue and what can they do to get information to the family and bring the services to the youth that they serve. so that part of it is exciting to see that that kind of work is moving forward and i think probably next week, when i am working in the district that will be something that i will be helping to support and move forward as the pac tries to do that from the parent perspective. we also really appreciate commissioner fewer's invitation to submit the questions that the pac has for the conversations that you are having with the curriculu
heard the word innovation, i have to put a plug in for tradition. i have a very traditional education. i spent a lot of years in silence speaking latin up in the hills, living within the medieval framework. i do respect the past. we study it. if you are grounded in tradition, you feel quite confident in change and innovation. if you are insecure, you are very reluctant to embrace the unknown. i do think we need to in our education and politics, we have to have a new appreciation for our traditions and the patterns that describe our culture and our being as americans. having said all that, we have saved in california tens of billions in energy efficiency. when i first adopted those, people reacted negatively. we pushed ahead. and now in california we have ab 32. signed by a republican actor turned governor. promoting something i pick up on and promote further. the number of people in silicon valley defended ab23 against -- ab32 against an onslaught of texas oil companies. we defend when they tried to block your business. california gets 50% of the venture capital. there is a lot going on
" and we have been around for about 32 years. we're nonprofit and we do both education and advocacy and on the education end we develop be curriculum and the curriculum is used widely across the country. it's in every state in the country and in canada and 70 countries around the world and programs we're familiar with is second step and i am hearing some nods and we have a -- idea of kind of what kind of things that we do, and i also do advocacy work so i come and speak at meetings like this. i was at the attorney general's meeting in washington state and i would like to congratulate you and especially those in law enforcement in california for the high level of discourse that you have incredibly impressed today by what i have heard and my hats off to you for all the good work you're doing. so i do advocacy and part of that is kind of reaching out to people and bringing the message of social emotional learning not just to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the s
and his book, the one world schoolhouse. in it, presenting the benefits of online universal education for primary and secondary school students and discussings his career change to public educator. >> host: hi, sal, tell us about the book and the journey you went that led you to writing the book? >> guest: the book is about the journey, but how that informed what khan became and how that could inform what learning could become, and not just in a pies in the sky way, but this is really happening and feels like we're in this inflection point in what's going on in classrooms. you know, the whole adventure for me started somewhat inadvertently. it was 2004. i was working as an analyst at a hedge fund at the time. just got married. family from new orleans visiting me in boston after my wedding, and one cousin, nadia, was having trouble. 12 years old, a bright girl, share some of the beauty, and when i asked her, her mom told me, and nadia said she was having trouble with units. i said, let me tutor you. she thought i was bluffing. she went back to new orleans, got on the phone, we used som
services to the arab couldn't health and education and immigration his days start in the early mornings, commuting between court appointments homes of low increase and disabled clints, hospitals and schools and his work leads into the late evenings he can be found in the late trip ac's where he tutors nearly 50 america youth to help them understand the important of education their futures in the world and academic excellence his mint doesn't stop at mentoring he helps many student pursue scholarships to per view their dreams for higher education he understand the value and importance of community service and empowering our people to be strong and proud and conscious and capable members of the community who never forgot their heritage. so abraham, on behalf of the city and county of the san francisco x we will like to presented you with the 2012 distinguished service award. (applause). >>> thank you all and i appreciate this very much from the government of san francisco and i thanks our community at large and everyone who is here and for them, i thank them also and we will try our be
said, educate the educators, make sure they receive the education and understand that relationships are as important as the classroom can urriculum, especially at the secondary level, continue to hammer out policies that are not so punitive but restore we want to connect to correct. we don't want to punish. we often move kids from one environment it another but it doesn't help them make right and it doesn't help others. this is a systemic problem, it's not going to go away. but we can begin and we are, the people on this panel, those of you in this room, we're taking incremental steps. but one of the things we have to do is keep organizing ourselves and understanding the coordinated integrated way so services aren't bolted on, added on and become just a one and done in too many schools. it's got to be really embraced as what we call a whole school climate framework, a whole school climate improvement plan. and when we embrace that, everybody can come to the table and take what can i do? each one teach one, each one reach one, we change policy, we change practices, we change v
-profit and federal education. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> we are just getting back. the energy level is probably going to get mellow. we will make that work for us. today's panel is on the question of for-profit and federal education policy. this is a topic that we at aei have been talking about for an extended stretch. in support of the templeton foundation, we have been running the private enterprise projects, trying to think about the opportunities and the challenge. how do make this work for kids in the community's? how do we think about some of the challenges the potential perils? this panel is a close of a series of panels and conversations. we have commissioned a number of pieces that will be coming up as a book this spring. we have the opportunity to work. phones, inose of the was cell turn them off. why this topic? the vast majority of what we do in america k-12 is done by public institutions. it is done by institutions run by states. and a lot of other work including most charter schools are run by no
a large time in cal fire on public education and prevention and also with respect to you were talking about fuel, the fuels program, or vegetation management program in cal fire, we have a robust program throughout the state where we are conducting burning operations and vegetation management with prieflt ranch owners and private land owners as well as on state and cooperating with our federal agencies with the u.s. forest service. so two-fold program, vegetation management, we aggressively pursue that, but also from a public education stand point. what we find in these large scale incidents, the public is going to have to be self-sustaining and self-supporting. they need to be prepared. we try to educate them in respect that we say we'll provide the offense, you provide the defense. we talk to them about hardening their structures in a defensive measure against wild land fires. a lot of it is public education, survivability, building standards, but predominately our focus is putting the onus on the land owner, putting the onus on the private property owner, we will attempt to pr
of american education, the very best in many areas would be found in the public. people have heard of the renown of the berkeley physics department, although now every year people talk about whether it is in decline. but think about programs like history at the university of wisconsin, social sciences in michigan. you have all sorts of areas where, for much of the history of american education, the very best to not necessarily go to the ivy league. today, though, we are at an end to -- we are in a time of significant disadvantage for public universities attracting and keeping faculty. it to give you some figures on salary, just to set the stage, the average full-time faculty member at a private research university this year is turning little more than $152,000. at a public that figure is $120,000. the average salary for an assistant professor at private research university is 89,000, which is greater than the average for an associate professor at public universities which is 80,000. it used to be that if you look at research universities, public and private, that were close to one
by the san francisco board of education. we, in san francisco, have seen tremendous economic growth coming out of the most severe recession since the great depression, and having served on regional bodies that include other jurisdictions, i can tell you that we are very lucky in san francisco, that we are lucky that we have the resources that we have had, and that we hopefully will continue to have. but, yetd yet, in a city as wealthy as san francisco we have a school district that is facing a crisis. we have about half of our students in this class of 2014 that may not be able to graduate and meet the requirements. san francisco has to do better than that. and even though money is not everything, the ability for us to commit resources as a city is really important. and what i understand of this item is that there is a discussion about whether or not to tie the funding that's underlying this item to the rainy day fund. and to the extent that happens, to the extent that there is a connection between this appropriation and the rainy day fund, i will not support it. the rainy day fund was cre
on a child's chances for success. the book profiles the work being done in new york by educator geoffrey canada. if we are glad you have joined us. coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: paul tough is a contributor for the new york times magazine, published a book on education this year, how children succeed, the hidden power of character. good have you back and congratulations on your success. can i pick apart the title? how children succeed, i get it. the hidden power of character, it seems to me that the way the kids learn is to be encouraged to try and to fail. try again, fail again, fail better. it is a wonderful quote from beckett but parents don't want their k
a look at the washington, d.c. charter school system. later, changes in higher education. >> this week on "newsmakers," we want to welcome mary kay henry. we have two reporters to help us with this conversation today. lindsey cook, "national journ al." >> mary, you met with the president last week on these so- called fiscal cliff. what kind of assurances did you get from the president about his willingness to put entitlement cuts on the table in his negotiations? >> the president was crystal clear on his desire to get a conversation as a top priority before any cuts could be entertained. what we were pleased to hear, both community and labor leaders to work together in that meeting, was how completely clear the president was on respecting the will of the electorate from the november 6 election, where he believes he offered the nation a choice, and that the popular vote and the electoral vote said, yes, it is time for the wealthy americans to pay their fair share. >> did you get a sense that if he does get what he is asking for in revenue, he would be willing to entertain
for education by girls in pakistan has received global attention since the shooting of malala yousafzai last month. islamic extremists shot the 15-year-old education campaigner, a move that caused outrage among the international community. the incident has exposed the dangers faced by girls in pakistan who want an education. nhk world's cameron masrur reports from islamabad. >> reporter: this junior high school for girls was blown up on november 27th. it was one of many schools in northwest pakistan attacked by militants. the attacks have continued even after last month's shooting of malala yousafzai promised wide criticism. they are thought to be the work of the pakistani taliban. this girl is a student at the school. >> translator: all the classrooms were destroyed. there is nothing left. >> reporter: for now, she stu studies at home, but she wants to go back to school as quickly as possible. no matter the danger. >> translator: islam allows women's education. why did our school get destroyed? education is our right. >> reporter: an angry message thought to be from a student is written on
institute which is a huge time. now we have a well-developed system of education for young people, for older people the people who are mostly focused on personal development and intellectual stimulation. what we are missing our school for the second half of life and again in communities around the country, people are going through the do it yourself process. there has been at doubling for example of people over 50 going to divinity school since 1990, a phenomenon that "time" magazine referred to as holy rollers. and but this is then happening in many -- as well. we need to do a better job at making those programs efficient expedited and affordable care of the same "time" magazine article i referred to describe a woman who had been a pediatric nurse in florida and became an episcopal priest, close to $100,000. she had to sell her house and she sold her car and took a vow of poverty to make it through that period. why not come up with better ways for people to say for this transition that so many more going through? there was another article in "the wall street journal" that describes the grow
. and as we come to realize that our educational system is not as good as we like to believe, that our health care system is not as good as we like to believe, that we are spending, i mean, there are so many things that are on the brink of taking us into real disaster. not the least of them being, you know, the possibility of cyber warfare. i mean, that's something that television is ought to be covering the time. i am tremendously concerned by the fact that the american public and its military have never been as far apart as they are right now. we know nothing. we do a terrific job of calling anyone in uniform a hero. we do a terrific job of welcoming them at airports, saying thank you for your service. we know nothing about what's going on in the military. and once more, the military and military operations these days are being launched on the basis of drone attacks, cia operatives, special operations forces out in the field, and all of that backed by civilian employees, civilian contractors. and we know next to nothing about what is being done by any of these groups spent because the repor
. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to
and chancellor of the new york city public schools joel kline had a somewhat on education reform in washington examining america's education system and the impact on national security. council on foreign relations moderates the discussion, about an hour. >> welcome to this evening, broadcast of morning joe. the energy in this room is a real testament to two things. one is how the education reform has ripened, a combination of meade, the talent we see in this room has coalesced on the issue of new technologies but there is a sense that the moment has arrived and the other is jeb bush. [applause] >> i am a great believer that two things matter in life. won his ideas and the other is people. that is the real driver of change, the real driver of history. when you unpack it all and jeb bush is a perfect example. the coming together of a person with real talent and drive with a set of ideas and this is one of them. the fact that you are all here is the greatest salute you could give. condoleezza rice and i come out of a national security background. we use to mess around with something called the ra
the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and to roman citizenship. it became very consolidated, expanding group of energetic people. and they'll work. they were not just a bunch of talkers, they were doing. -- there were doers. -- they were doers. we have to consolidate on this. we have to find the common path that will enable us to make the investments and undergo the sacrifice that is required because it is not all ice cream and cake here. you have to curtail consumption. whether it is a business or household. in terms of -- the free sector. it is still the same game. looking out for the future, saving for tomorr
this over to joe, the vice president of education at the zoo. i wanted to briefly introduce the item. again, this is discussion and possible action to approve the zoo's conceptual plan for the renovation to the playground at the zoo and expenditure of up to 2.3 million. including 138,000 from recreation and parks department. two, to adopt finding under the california environmental quality act and adopt mitigation, monitoring and reporting program. that 138,000 was already previously approved. just reaffirming the expenditure of that. this is existing playground in poor shape. doesn't meet certain current safety code. included in your commission report under attachments three and four, we worked closely with the planning department to identify and describe all the appropriate seek what language that is needed the to move forward. it was included and covered under the environmental impact report. we have included that information in your packets. so staff recommendation is to approve. i will now turn it over to joe fitting, thank you. >> good morning commissioners and general managers. it is
community service, your essential coverage in the media, your commitment to education and to health and assures every one of us reaches the true heights of our potential, and lastly to the innovators constantly looking for new ways to make our lives efficient and making sure everyone has access to information. we are humbled by all of your service, and all of us share a common vision that is really focused our family and youth in our city. just this past summer i had the privilege of working with leader pelosi to take up president obama's call to create as many summer jobs as we could possibly create for our youth. leader pelosi we thank you for standing with us to assure the commitment of the corporate partners to invest in our youth. earlier this summer i was happy to sit down with the secretary of labor and announce we surpassed our goal and over 5,000 jobs for our kids in san francisco. [applause] that was a result of city agencies working with corporate and private partners and together we got that done, and we all know the quality of work experience for a young person can
mrs. yong. rene antavares. please approach the mic. >> hello, i am the education advocate for chinese education. and i work with a lot of chinese families with english learners. and the data shows that 69% of english learners in 11th grade are missing requirements or off track to graduate in 2014. and that's overwhelming over 500 student. and because of the additional english classes the students have to take. they are unable to fulfill the requirements and therefore they need the additional funding for the credits. the families need the guidance for the necessary requirements to graduate and apply for college. we are here to ask for the committee to support this supplementation for credit recovery and for the resources for class 2014. so that all students get the necessary resources and opportunities to graduate. >> thank you. >> good afternoon, i am kevin bogus and i work with advocates for children youth. you am here to speak on behalf of families and youth in san francisco. we are in a crisis where close to 50% of the students that are juniors in our high school are preparing not
need to invest in education, infrastructure. we need to find some revenues. that is part of the fight in washington in the next month. host: this so-called fiscal cliff -- you said the tax cuts should expire. what would be the impact of tax cuts expiring for the middle- class and others? guest: look, this election was about how we recreate andry imagine the american dream for those who want to be in the middle-class and those who want a broad and middle-class. of course it would hurt if -- that is part of the reason why they talked about it as a real deadline. we need to maintain the middle- class tax cuts. we need to maintain a balanced approach. what the movement is trying to do is push at that, make sure there is a safety net for medicare, for social security, for medicaid, making sure those investments in our future like education and infrastructure -- finding some of the revenue to do that, which is why we are pushing for the expiration of the bush tax cuts for the wealthy, those over a quarter of a million dollars. >> here are the numbers to call -- sequestration, these schedule
for the board of education for october 23rd october, 23012, is called to order. >> commissioner fewer. >> here. >> miss maufus? >> here. >> miss mazzucco and dr. merasi? >> present. >> miss wynns? >> dr. murase? >> here. >> thank you. >> mr. yee? >> present. >> thank you. >> and miss wong here. >> and miss ly. >> here. >> i would like to stand up and joint us for the pledge of allegiance. okay. we are going to we have a fairly nice agenda for today and hopefully we will zip there it. >> item a, approval of board minutes of may, 8, 22, october 9ed. >> any objections? >> seeing none? >> mr. yee. >> yes. miss fewer. >> yes. >> maufus, yes. >> miss norton. >> miss wynn? aye. >> and mr. yee. aye. >> item b. >> presentation of the board of education superintendant report. >> superintendant carranza? >> thank you, members of the board and the public and good evening this evening and i am very excited to say thank you for joining us and as you can tell, we are very, very excited because before i shared my thoughts for the evening, i want to say go giants. >> yes. [ applause ] >> so, we
everything we have and the marines to fight a fire. we've worked hard to educate them, i think a lot of them get it now but it was a challenge initially. >> thank you. do you want to say anything? >> yeah, i wanted to comment on operatability within the california national guard. they worked really well within the framework that we established with cal fire and then beyond that throughout the national guard and the army, all of our aviators train to the same standards so really we're able to integrate any aircrew from any state, any component, into our program at any time because we're operating you noah cording you know, according to the same standards. back in 2008 we had a very large fire event here in california and we aircraft from 22 states responding to that. there is capability to respond within the national guard alone and we have started developing relationships with our title 10 partners, we do similar academics every year like they do so i think that helps generate interoperatability amongst the title 10 and title 32 assets within the state as well. >> well, i don't know abou
. [applause] >> next the chairman of cbs news. then bill gates talks about changes in education. then youth campaign to fix the national debt. >>> on news makers mayor kay henry talks about the so-called fiscal cliff and wa what unions hope will happen. news makers sunday at 10:00 and 6:00 eastern on c-span. >> jeff sog gerfwame first chairman of cbs news. now he talked about the future of news at the arizona state university downtown campus in phoenix. this is just over an hour. >> good evening, everyone. the cronkite school has a special relationship with cbs news. walter cronkite served as the evening news anger for nearly 20 years becoming known as the most trusted man in america for his objective, straightforward reporting. he was the face of cbs. three years after he stepped down from the news anger desk, the school was named in is honored. that grew over the next 25 years. today three years after his passing, he continues to be our guiding light. it is truly a special honor to have jeff fager with us tonight to talk about the traditional values of journalism and how those values rema
times what the rest of public education costs. and many, and the vast majority of our basis we use public schools. we could take the money we're spending today, pay every public school system 14,000 per child, and save billions of dollars per year just on, and with the same or better outcomes. >> this weekend talk with oklahoma senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff, the affordable care act and the future of the republican party on "book tv"'s in depth. the senator written several books and reports including the latest, the debt bomb. join the conversation with calls, e-mails and tweets comements and for doctor, senator tom coy burn. sunday noon eastern on "book tv"'s in depth on c-span2. >>> up next, for-profit practitioners discuss the role of private enterprise in public education. they lose also look at the obama administration approach to education reform. that was hosted yesterday at the american enterprise institute in washington. it is 90 minutes. >> hi. welcome, thanks for joining us. whether you're here at home, hope everybody had a terrific thanksgiving. i know that w
was very impressed with design. often our office has to take on an educational role along with our regulatory role and try to teach designers about access compliance. that wasn't really the case here. i felt that the developer had done their homework and the designers [speaker not understood], it includes accessible site features and the surrounding open spaces and the park areas and the boat launch and also the approach to the [speaker not understood] entries. we discussed program access for special outdoor events that might take place out in the open spaces, and we also discuss accessible boat docks. as we move into the inside of the stadium, you know, under plans yet to be developed, we also come across issues about obtaining accessible line of sight. [speaker not understood]. this office is a lot more detailed review as this goes on as the concept evolves into fund r finished design. i also do have the commitment from oewd to be part of those discussions and be to be able to be certain that the access is built in from the very beginning. and that's something that we had to show
for the education that the city has always invested in. indeed, we have the examples of the people who brought this into entrepreneurship. the pathway to education did not start with mit. although it is an example of the land-grant politics. mit is a land grant college. but if you think about it turning towards education, it didn't happen in the 19th century, it happened when the first bostonians came here and decided to create the boston law school. .. we thought it is in institution but we were very worried about the jesuits and the kingdom of the antichrist was the word on the news to describe the fear of jesuit education in the new world so we were deeply religious the fractious world, and it was seen as a critical investment in that. it worked out for the best but its roots go back to the religious fractures of the early seventeenth century. >> if boston is the center of higher education continues to bear fruit for us, continues to reward us, does the mere presence, let me ask you this, the presence of harvard and all the rest guarantee do you think, that we state that way in the future?
hope i don't get this wrong. so correct me, ladies, if i'm wrong. education is not the enemy. so i hope i did thatwwwpoÑ<1 rightl[!go> continuing on, this is for superintendent carranza82k> j.%móx1 jrotc. >> i'd like to call ram ileoto the podium regarding the lowell high school second place finish in the national 2011-12 symposium and academic bowl. first sergeant. >>[!n? and gentlemen and board members. i'm extremely proud to be here on behalf of lowell high school and the students in front of you. but let me start with s8,rá' something with you that i'm extremely proud of. i'm also a product of the junior rotc class from mission high school and back here after 23 years of active service. i'd like to present to you without further ado the the number one academic public school jrtv program. this gentleman on my right to your left is cadet -- jordan wong, michael>! mitchell wong. they're actually brothers,<-fb3g@y the wong brothersqyqqj here. and,í=o years the lowel
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